HR Top Tips

GHR top tips

You may have seen the LGBTQ+ acronym when referring to one of the protected characteristics in relation to employment and inclusion. At Grounded HR we are proud “allies” to the community.   

NationalToday.com say “June is Pride month and a time when everyone to embrace who they are and let the world know – in style!” 

However, did you know more than 1/3 of the LGBTQ+ community hide who they are at work? 

At Grounded HR we concur with what Stonewall state; that “People perform better when they can be themselves” so we’re focusing our tips this month workplace inclusivity. 

How can you achieve workplace inclusivity? 

One of the simplest ways workplace inclusivity can be achieved is through educating yourselves and others around you. This is part of continuous learning and personal development both as a colleague and if you are in a supervisory role. 

One key aspect to remember is to remain respectful and be mindful of not asking personal questions, but rather wait for your employee or colleague to offer information. If you are curious do some research on the topic with charities such as Stonewall, Galop or Mermaids to name a few. 

Inclusivity can be achieved through being mindful of things such as policies through to using pronouns on your email. 

Pronouns can be Mr. Mrs. Miss. Ms or Mx (pronounced Mix) 

For example, have you used neutral wording in your policies? 

You should also ensure that you have specifically mentioned the types of discrimination, victimisation and harassment that will not be tolerated within your company. This principle should also apply to your data categories, being specific shows, you are aware of protected characteristics and your awareness as an employer to best practice approaches.  

Maybe you wish to go a step further and have a Transitioning at work policy? 

Even though you may be an ally of the LGBTQ+ community it's also important to remember your own privilege and when to step back when needed.   

However, you should also balance this with not being a passive bystander if you observe or become aware of an incident/action which needs addressing.  

This doesn’t just apply to the LGBTQ+ protected characteristic but any form of discriminatory behaviour within the workplace.